distro
HOWTO: Starcraft 2 on Linux with Wine
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Starcraft 2 [runs] under my Linux install with no issues. Since the game’s official release a few days ago I have been getting a good bit of traffic on those two pages - so I figured I would put together a quick HOWTO for getting Starcraft 2 working on your Linux distro of choice. The game runs under Wine 1.2 and/or CrossoverGames 9.1. Crossover 9.1 Starcraft 2 is listed as “officially support” and as such you will find that it has an entry in the automated games installer.

Always display the location bar in Nautilus
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya
This is a pretty good tip. The default style irritates me to no end. Check out the full post, there are some great tips, especially if you’re new to Nautilus like me. Ever since some distros started their attempt to become more “user-friendly” and gaining the nice looks, some default features got changed. In this case, it’s the location bar. Instead of it they got some buttons that shows the location and let you navigate through the directories!

openSUSE 11.3 Released – Download Now
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya
openSUSE 11.3 is based on Linux kernel 2.6.34 and has KDE Software Compilation 4.4.4 as the default desktop environment. A GNOME version is also available and it uses GNOME 2.30.1. In terms of the default applications, it comes with Thunderbird 3.0.5, Firefox 3.6.4 and OpenOffice 3.2.1 to name a few. openSUSE 11.3 also gives the user the choice of using Btrfs during installation. You can view the complete changelog here or read the release note.

4096-Byte Sector Hard Drives & Linux
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Recently, I bought a pair of those new Western Digital Caviar Green drives. These new drives represent a transitional point from 512-byte sectors to 4096-byte sectors. A number of articles have been published recently about this, explaining the benefits and some of the challenges that we’ll be facing during this transition. Reportedly, Linux should unaffected by some of the pitfalls of this transition, but my own experimentation has shown that Linux is just as vulnerable to the potential performance impact as Windows XP.

Damn Vulnerable Linux
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya
A whole linux distro, Slackware based I believe, to train you in the dark arts. This distro is deliberately insecure, containing out of date packages, mis-configured apps, and loads of training material. It comes as a live dvd download, so you can run it up as and when you want to practice your skills. via Damn Vulnerable Linux. Will be interesting to check it out.

[How-to] Make nVidia settings persistent and retain the settings in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Bharath

Nvidia Proprietary Drivers need nvidia-settings to set screen resolution and change other settings. In previous versions of Ubuntu and in other distros to make them permanent (used in every session) you click the “Save to X configuration file”. From Karmic on there is no xorg.conf by default!

As a result, nvidia-settings is not able to save the settings and every time I logged in I had  to change the resolution (Phew!!!). Then Sathya helped me. He gave me a link from Ubuntu Forums{#aptureLink_MZsWFB9Cv4}. Then I did the following to fix the problem:


Mounting .iso and .mds/mdf Files in Linux
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
There are lots of times where you’d want to mount a CD/DVD image. Say your friend who uses his Windows box has given you a .iso file or a .mds/mdf file, created using Alcohol 120%. How would you mount them in Linux? Using the Terminal and making use of the loop device,there is no need for any external software tools and utlities. Here’s the steps: Open the Terminal/Console. Switch to root user(mounting more often than not requires root privileges, we’ll have a look as to how make media user-mountable later) by typing su root *buntu users and others distros in which the root account is disabled, can skip this step.