root
ArchLinux Install & Setup Guide – Part 1 – The actual install
· β˜• 6 min read · ✍️ Sathya

Been a while since I posted ;) For some strange reason, recently I got an urge to try out ArchLinux{#aptureLink_BWSwiwROlt}. After much deliberation finally decided to try out ArchLinux again, in VirtualBox{#aptureLink_YQu9cIpVYm}. My little install guide I compiled as I was reading through the Official ArchLinux Install Guide{#aptureLink_OrVThoOrTI} + Beginner’s Guide{#aptureLink_AMQvvRytbx}.

Please note: This is highly customized according to *my* requirements and nowhere as thorough /generalized as the official guides. Still, it might help you. Here we go -


β€œKernel-panic – not syncing : VFS : Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block(X,X)” error in Ubuntu
· β˜• 1 min read · ✍️ Bharath
This one seems to be a really famous problem for most folks in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala. So I had it too. The problem was on the initrd file. It is a kernel related file needed for booting. So i did a simple thing. I replaced initrd.img file of my kernel version with “initrd.lz” file from the Ubuntu LiveCD and edited my grub.cfg file (equivalent of menu.lst in older Ubuntu releases), to boot using initrd.

Mounting file system created by Wubi in other Linux distros
· β˜• 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya

I wasn’t aware of this tiny little thing Β - the filesystem in the Β file created by a Wubi install can be easily mounted as a loop device.


[How-to] Make nVidia settings persistent and retain the settings in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Bharath

Nvidia Proprietary Drivers need nvidia-settings to set screen resolution and change other settings. In previous versions of Ubuntu and in other distros to make them permanent (used in every session) you click the “Save to X configuration file”. From Karmic on there is no xorg.conf by default!

As a result, nvidia-settings is not able to save the settings and every time I logged in I hadΒ  to change the resolution (Phew!!!). Then Sathya helped me. He gave me aΒ link from Ubuntu Forums{#aptureLink_MZsWFB9Cv4}. Then I did the following to fix the problem:


Updating to openSUSE 11.2
· β˜• 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya

As mentioned openSUSE 11.2 is now available. If you’re on previous versions of openSUSE you can do an inplace upgrade to 11.2 by using zypper.

openSUSE 11.0/openSUSE 11.1

Just change the repos to mention 11.2 instead of 11.0/11.1, as shown in the pic:


openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 8 And Release Candidates(RC) add boot from USB flash disk option, here’s how to use it
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya

Howdy folks! Been a *loong* time since I last posted isn’t it? Just been busy with work & travel (won’t bore you with the details, just check my personal blog{#aptureLink_20DGMzo67U}).

I’ve been looking forward to the upcoming openSUSE 11.2 version ( it’s no secret that I’m a fan of openSUSE{#aptureLink_yxkV6H9kot}), but the main problem for me was that I don’t like holding onto optical media, and have a 8gig USB flash disk, especially for these things.

UnfortunatelyΒ  openSUSE has been lacking a install/boot from USB flash drive for quite sometime, upto now that is. The last Milestone (M8) and the first release candidate, RC1 includes support for booting from USB flash disks.

You will need access to a Linux environment, inorder to accomplish this step.


Mounting .iso and .mds/mdf Files in Linux
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
There are lots of times where you’d want to mount a CD/DVD image. Say your friend who uses his Windows box has given you a .iso file or a .mds/mdf file, created using Alcohol 120%. How would you mount them in Linux? Using the Terminal and making use of the loop device,there is no need for any external software tools and utlities. Here’s the steps: Open the Terminal/Console. Switch to root user(mounting more often than not requires root privileges, we’ll have a look as to how make media user-mountable later) by typing su root *buntu users and others distros in which the root account is disabled, can skip this step.