sudo
[How-to] Make nVidia settings persistent and retain the settings in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Bharath

Nvidia Proprietary Drivers need nvidia-settings to set screen resolution and change other settings. In previous versions of Ubuntu and in other distros to make them permanent (used in every session) you click the “Save to X configuration file”. From Karmic on there is no xorg.conf by default!

As a result, nvidia-settings is not able to save the settings and every time I logged in I hadΒ  to change the resolution (Phew!!!). Then Sathya helped me. He gave me aΒ link from Ubuntu Forums{#aptureLink_MZsWFB9Cv4}. Then I did the following to fix the problem:


[How-to] Fix β€œE: Unable to parse package file /var/lib/apt/extended_states (1)” error in Synaptic or apt-get
· β˜• 1 min read · ✍️ Bharath
This is just a quick tip. If you are getting this error message in Synaptic: E: Unable to parse package file /var/lib/apt/extended_states (1) E: _cache->open() failed, please report or this error in apt-get in command line: Reading package lists… Done Building dependency tree Reading state information… Error! E: Unable to parse package file /var/lib/apt/extended_states (1) and both just fail to open or install, then just execute this in command line (terminal):

Mounting .iso and .mds/mdf Files in Linux
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
There are lots of times where you’d want to mount a CD/DVD image. Say your friend who uses his Windows box has given you a .iso file or a .mds/mdf file, created using Alcohol 120%. How would you mount them in Linux? Using the Terminal and making use of the loop device,there is no need for any external software tools and utlities. Here’s the steps: Open the Terminal/Console. Switch to root user(mounting more often than not requires root privileges, we’ll have a look as to how make media user-mountable later) by typing su root *buntu users and others distros in which the root account is disabled, can skip this step.

Formatting USB pen drive in Linux using Terminal
· β˜• 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Insert your USB pen drive. Let it get detected and mounted. Open Terminal. Type The Following commands dmesg |tail -> here the β€˜|’ key is the pipe, ie, the key before the backspace key(the upper one, so press shift) You’ll get something like sathya@shaman:~$ dmesg |tail [ 9921.681164] sda: Write Protect is off [ 9921.681174] sda: Mode Sense: 23 00 00 00 [ 9921.681178] sda: assuming drive cache: write through