commands
Mounting .iso and .mds/mdf Files in Linux
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathyajith Bhat
There are lots of times where you’d want to mount a CD/DVD image. Say your friend who uses his Windows box has given you a .iso file or a .mds/mdf file, created using Alcohol 120%. How would you mount them in Linux? Using the Terminal and making use of the loop device,there is no need for any external software tools and utlities. Here’s the steps: Open the Terminal/Console. Switch to root user(mounting more often than not requires root privileges, we’ll have a look as to how make media user-mountable later) by typing su root *buntu users and others distros in which the root account is disabled, can skip this step.

Formatting USB pen drive in Linux using Terminal
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathyajith Bhat
Insert your USB pen drive. Let it get detected and mounted. Open Terminal. Type The Following commands dmesg |tail -> here the ‘|' key is the pipe, ie, the key before the backspace key(the upper one, so press shift) You’ll get something like sathya@shaman:~$ dmesg |tail [ 9921.681164] sda: Write Protect is off [ 9921.681174] sda: Mode Sense: 23 00 00 00 [ 9921.681178] sda: assuming drive cache: write through

5 Commands Every Linux Newbie Must Know
· ☕ 3 min read · ✍️ Sathyajith Bhat
Although Linux had progressed far from being a command-line only OS to a full fledged totally GUI based one, sometimes, the command line is the best way to get something done. Here are 5 of the must-know commands. These commands can b quite useful and handy. 1: mount: Used for mounting Windows/Other partitions, just in case it isn’t automatically mounted. Usage: mount here refers to the special device where your partitions are.