filesystem
How To: Access Linux partitions ( including ext4) From Windows
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Ext2Read is a Free & Open Source Software which allows you to browse your Linux partitions in a very Windows Explorer-esque interface. Unlike other tools{#aptureLink_bvNHKIheYw} Ext2Read also supports ext4 filesystem, even if extents feature is enabled. Like the name suggests – Ext2Read can only read, not write to the partitions – so in case you are paranoid about the tool causing data corruption to your Linux partitions, you can drop those fears.

ArchLinux Install & Setup Guide – Part 1 – The actual install
· ☕ 6 min read · ✍️ Sathya

Been a while since I posted ;) For some strange reason, recently I got an urge to try out ArchLinux{#aptureLink_BWSwiwROlt}. After much deliberation finally decided to try out ArchLinux again, in VirtualBox{#aptureLink_YQu9cIpVYm}. My little install guide I compiled as I was reading through the Official ArchLinux Install Guide{#aptureLink_OrVThoOrTI} + Beginner’s Guide{#aptureLink_AMQvvRytbx}.

Please note: This is highly customized according to *my* requirements and nowhere as thorough /generalized as the official guides. Still, it might help you. Here we go -


Mounting file system created by Wubi in other Linux distros
· ☕ 1 min read · ✍️ Sathya

I wasn’t aware of this tiny little thing  - the filesystem in the  file created by a Wubi install can be easily mounted as a loop device.


How To: Access ext2/ext3 Formatted Linux Partitions in Windows
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Unlike Linux which can mount and access Windows’ FAT, FAT16, FAT32 and NTFS filesystems, Windows is incapable of even acknowledging and detecting a Linux filesystem. Fear not, here are 3 softwares which can help in detecting your Linux partition under Windows Ext2fsd- The most capable software of the lot. Has read/write support to your Linux partition. The 0.45 version supports replay of journal of a ext3 filesystem in case of a unclean shutdown of your Linux partition.

Formatting USB pen drive in Linux using Terminal
· ☕ 2 min read · ✍️ Sathya
Insert your USB pen drive. Let it get detected and mounted. Open Terminal. Type The Following commands dmesg |tail -> here the ‘|’ key is the pipe, ie, the key before the backspace key(the upper one, so press shift) You’ll get something like sathya@shaman:~$ dmesg |tail [ 9921.681164] sda: Write Protect is off [ 9921.681174] sda: Mode Sense: 23 00 00 00 [ 9921.681178] sda: assuming drive cache: write through